Friday, February 12, 2021

6:29 p.m. The Senate stands adjourned until 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, February 13, 2021.

6:23 p.m. ML Schumer announced there were no further questions. ML Schumer and RL McConnell spoke about USCP officer Eugene Goodman and asked unanimous consent to call up and pass S. 35 Awarding Capitol Police officer Eugene Goodman the Congressional Gold Medal. The bill was passed by unanimous consent.

6:20 p.m. Mr. Castor, representing former President Trump responded. House Manager Raskin responded.

6:18 p.m. Senator Cornyn asked both sides: The House managers have argued that if the Senate cannot convict former officers, then the Constitution creates a January exception. Pursuant to which a President is free to act with impunity because he is not subject to impeachment, conviction, and removal, and/or disqualification. But isn’t a President subject to criminal prosecution after he leaves office for acts committed in office, even if those acts are committed in January?

6:12 p.m. House Manager Castro responded.

6:11 p.m. Senator Bennett asked: SINCE THE NOVEMBER ELECTION, THE GEORGIA SECRETARY OF STATE, THE VICE PRESIDENT, AND OTHER PUBLIC OFFICIALS, WITHSTOOD ENORMOUS PRESSURE TO UPHOLD THE LAWFUL ELECTION OF PRESIDENT BIDEN AND THE RULE OF LAW. WHAT WOULD HAVE HAPPENED IF THESE OFFICIALS HAD BOWED TO THE FORCE PRESIDENT TRUMP EXERTED OR THE MOB THAT ATTACKED THE CAPITOL?

6:10 p.m. Senator Leahy noted for all Counsel that all parties in the Chamber must refrain from using language that is not conducive to civil discourse.

6:06 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

6:04 p.m. Senator Rubio asked both sides: Voting to convict the former President would create a new precedent that a former official can be convicted and disqualified by the Senate. Therefore, is it not true that under this new precedent, a future house, facing partisan pressure to lock her up, could impeach a former Secretary of State and a future Senate be forced to put her on trial and potentially disqualify from any future office?

6:01 p.m. House Manager Raskin responded.

6:01 p.m. Senator Van Hollen asked the House Mangers: WOULD YOU PLEASE RESPOND TO THE ANSWER THAT WAS JUST GIVEN BY THE FORMER PRESIDENT’S COUNSEL.

5:56 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

5:55 p.m. Senator Marshall asked: THE HOUSE MANAGERS SINGLE ARTICLE OF IMPEACHMENT IS CENTERED ON THE ACCUSATION THAT PRESIDENT TRUMP SINGULARLY INCITED A CROWD INTO A RIOT. DIDN’T THE HOUSE MANAGERS CONTRADICT THEIR OWN CHARGE BY OUTLINING THE PREMEDITATED NATURE AND PLANNING OF THIS EVENT AND BY ALSO SHOWING THE CROWD WAS GATHERED AT THE CAPITOL EVEN BEFORE THE SPEECH STARTED AND BARRIERS WERE PUSHED OVER SOME 20 MINUTES BEFORE THE CONCLUSION OF TRUMP’s SPEECH?

5:51 p.m. House Manager Raskin responded.

5:50 p.m. Senator Blumenthal asked: FORMER PRESIDENT TRUMP AND HIS ATTORNEYS HAVE CITED THE BRANDENBERG V. OHIO CASE SAYING THAT THE FIRST AMENDMENT PROTECTS TRUMP. DID IT HOLD PUBLIC OFFICIALS ACCOUNTABLE THROUGH THE IMPEACHMENT PROCESS FOR THE INCITEMENT OF VIOLENCE?

5:43 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

5:43 p.m. Senator Sullivan asked: THE HOUSE MANAGER SAID YESTERDAY THAT DUE PROCESS IS DISCRETIONARY, MEANING THE HOUSE IS NOT REQUIRED TO PROVIDE AND INDEED DID NOT PROVIDE IN THIS SNAP IMPEACHMENT ANY CONSTITUTIONAL PROTECTIONS TO A DEFENDANT IN THE HOUSE IMPEACHMENT PROCEEDINGS. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR OUR CONSTITUTIONAL ORDER OF THIS NEW HOUSE PRECEDENT COMBINED WITH THE SENATE’S POWER TO DISQUALIFY FROM PUBLIC OFFICE A PRIVATE CITIZEN IN AN IMPEACHMENT TRIAL?

5:40 p.m. House Manager Plaskett responded.

5:39 p.m. Senator Manchin asked: WOULD THE PRESIDENT BE MADE AWARE OF THE F.B.I. AND INTELLIGENCE INFORMATION OF A POSSIBLE ATTACK, AND WOULD THE PRESIDENT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR NOT PREPARING TO PROTECT THE CAPITOL AND ALL ELECTED OFFICIALS OF GOVERNMENT WITH NATIONAL GUARD AND LAW ENFORCEMENT AS HE DID WHEN HE APPEARED IN FRONT OF THE ST. JOHN’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH?

5:36 p.m. House Manager Raskin responded.

5:35 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

5:34 p.m. Senator Cassidy asked: SENATOR TUBERVILLE REPORTS THAT HE SPOKE TO PRESIDENT TRUMP AT 2:15 P.M. HE TOLD THE PRESIDENT THAT THE VICE PRESIDENT HAD JUST EVACUATED. I PRESUMED IT WAS UNDERSTOOD AT THIS TIME THAT RIOTERS HAD ENTERED THE CAPITOL AND THREATENED THE SAFETY OF SENATORS AND THE VICE PRESIDENT. EVEN AFTER HEARING — EVEN AFTER HEARING OF THIS, AT 2:24 P.M. THAT MIKE PENCE LACKED COURAGE. HE DID NOT CALL FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT BACKUP UNTIL THEN. THE TWEET AND LACK OF RESPONSE SUGGESTS PRESIDENT TRUMP DID NOT CARE THAT VICE PRESIDENT PENCE WAS ENDANGERED OR THAT LAW ENFORCEMENT WAS OVERWHELMED. DOES THIS SHOW THAT PRESIDENT TRUMP WAS TOLERANT OF THE INTIMIDATION OF VICE PRESIDENT PENCE?

5:29 p.m. House Manager Castro responded.

5:28 p.m. Senator Murray asked the House Managers AT 6:01 P.M. EASTERN TIME ON JANUARY 6, PRESIDENT TRUMP TWEETED, THESE ARE THE THINGS THAT HAPPEN WHEN A SACRED LANDSLIDE ELECTION VICTORY IS SO UNCEREMONIOUSLY AND VICIOUSLY STRIPPED AWAY FROM GREAT PATRIOTS WHO HAVE BEEN BADLY AND UNFAIRLY TREATED FOR SO LONG. ADDING, FOR RIOTERS TO GO HOME WITH LOVE AND IN PEACE. WHAT IS THE RELEVANCE OF THIS TWEET TO PRESIDENT’S TRUMP GUILT?

5:21 p.m. House Manager Raskin and and Mr Van Der Veen responded.

5:20 p.m. Senator Cruz asked both sides OUT OF THE THEIR 16 HOURS, THE HOUSE MANAGERS DEVOTED ALL OF 15 MINUTES TO ARTICULATING A NEWLY CREATED LEGAL STANDARD FOR INCITEMENT. ONE WAS VIOLENCE FORESEEABLE? TWO, DID HE ENCOURAGE VIOLENCE? THREE, DID HE DO SO WILLFULLY? IS THIS NEW STANDARD DERIVED FROM THE CRIMINAL CODE OR ANY SUPREME COURT CASE?

5:16 p.m. House Managers Castro and Raskin responded.

5:15 p.m. Senator Merkley asked House Managers IF A PRESIDENT SPINS A BIG LIE TO ANGER AMERICANS AND STOKES THE FURRY BY REPEATING THE LIE AT EVENT AFTER EVENT AND INVITES VIOLENT GROUPS TO D.C. ON THE DAY AND HOUR NECESSARY TO INTERRUPT THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE COUNT AND DOES NOTHING TO STOP THOSE GROUPS FROM ADVANCING ON THE CAPITOL AND FAILS TO SUMMON THE NATIONAL GUARD TO PROTECT THE CAPITOL AND THEN EXPRESSES PLEASURE AND DELIGHT THAT THE CAPITOL WAS UNDER ATTACK, IS THE PRESIDENT INNOCENT OF INCITING AN INSURRECTION BECAUSE IN A SPEECH HE SAYS “BE PEACEFUL”.

5:12 p.m. Mr Van Der Veen and House Manager Plaskett responded.

5:10 p.m. Senator Johnson asked both sides THE HOUSE MANAGERS ASSERT THAT THE JANUARY 6 ATTACK WAS PREDICTABLE AND IT WAS FORESEEABLE. IF SO, WHY DID IT APPEAR THAT LAW ENFORCEMENT AT THE CAPITOL WERE CAUGHT OFFGUARD AND UNABLE TO PREVENT THE BREACH? WHY DID THE HOUSE SERGEANT AT ARMS REPORTEDLY TURN DOWN A REQUEST TO ACTIVATE THE NATIONAL GUARD STATING THAT HE WAS NOT COMFORTABLE WITH THE OPTICS?

5:03 p.m. House Manager Plaskett and Mr Van Der Veen responded.

5:00 p.m. Senator Sanders asked both sides THE HOUSE PROSECUTORS HAVE STATED OVER AND OVER AGAIN THAT PRESIDENT TRUMP WAS PERPETRATING A BIG LIE WHEN HE REPEATEDLY CLAIMED THAT THE ELECTION WAS STOLEN FROM HIM AND THAT HE ACTUALLY WON THE ELECTION BY A LANDSLIDE. ARE THE PROSECUTORS RIGHT WHEN THEY CLAIM THAT TRUMP WAS TELLING A BIG LIE OR IN YOUR JUDGMENT, DID TRUMP ACTUALLY WIN THE ELECTION?

4:59 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

4:58 p.m. Senator Cramer asked a question: GIVEN THE ALLEGATIONS OF THE HOUSE MANAGER THAT PRESIDENT TRUMP HAS TOLERATED ANTI-SEMITIC RHETORIC, HAS THERE BEEN A MORE PRO-ISRAEL PRESIDENT THAN PRESIDENT TRUMP?

4:55 p.m. House Manager Raskin responded.

4:54 p.m. Senator Warren asked a question: THE DEFENSE’S PRESENTATION HIGHLIGHTED THE FACT THAT DEMOCRATIC MEMBERS OF CONGRESS RAISED OBJECTIONS TO COUNTING OF ELECTORAL VOTES IN PAST JOINT SESSIONS OF CONGRESS. TO YOUR KNOWLEDGE, WERE ANY OF THOSE DEMOCRATIC OBJECTIONS RAISED AFTER INSURRECTIONISTS STORMED THE CAPITOL IN ORDER TO PREVENT THE COUNTING OF ELECTORAL VOTES, AND AFTER THE PRESIDENT’S PERSONAL LAWYER ASKED SENATORS TO MAKE THESE OBJECTIONS SPECIFICALLY TO DELAY THE CERTIFICATION?

4:52 p.m. House Manager Raskin responded.

4:49 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

4:47 p.m. Senators Hawley and Cramer asked a question: IF THE SENATE’S POWER TO DISQUALIFY IS NOT DERIVATIVE OF THE POWER TO REMOVE A CONVICTED PRESIDENT FROM OFFICE, COULD THE SENATE DISQUALIFY A SITTING PRESIDENT BUT NOT REMOVE HIM OR HER?

4:42 p.m. House Manager Lieu responded.

4:41 p.m. Senator Padilla asked a question HAVING BEEN ON THE FLONT LINES OF — FRONT LINES OF COMBATING THE BIG LIE OVER THE PAST FOUR YEARS AS CALIFORNIA’S CHIEF ELECTION OFFICER, IT IS CLEAR THAT PRESIDENT TRUMP’S PLOT TO UNDERMINE THE 2020 ELECTION WAS BUILT ON LIES AND CONSPIRACY THEORIES. HOW DID THIS PLOT TO UNCONSTITUTIONALLY KEEP PRESIDENT TRUMP IN POWER LEAD TO THE RADICALIZATION OF SO MANY OF PRESIDENT TRUMP’S FOLLOWERS AND THE RESULTING ATTACK ON THE CAPITOL?

4:39 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

4:38 p.m. Senator Lee submitted a question on behalf of Senators Blackburn and Portman. Multiple state Constitutions enacted prior to 1787, namely the constitutions of Delaware, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Vermont specifically provided for the impeachment of a former officer. Given the framers of the US Constitution would’ve been aware of these provisions does their decision to omit language specifically authorizing the impeachment of former officials indicate that they did not intend for our Constitution to allow for the impeachment of former officials?

4:33 p.m. House Manager Plaskett responded.

4:31 p.m. Senators Klobuchar, Casey and Brown asked a question: In presenting your case, you relied on past precedence from impeachment trials such as William Belknap’s impeachment. After what you have presented in the course of this trial if we do not convict former president trump, what message will we be sending to future presidents and Congresses?

4:30 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

4:27 p.m. House Manager Castro responded.

4:26 p.m. Senators Romney and Collins asked a question: When President Trump sent the disparaging tweet at 2:24 p.m. regarding Vice President Pence, was he aware that the Vice President had been removed from the Senate by the Secret Service for his safety?

4:23 p.m. House Manager Plaskett responded.

4:21 p.m. Senators Markey and Duckworth asked a question: Exactly when did the President learn of the breach at the Capitol and what steps did he take to address the violence?

4:19 p.m. Mr. Castor, representing former President Trump responded.

4:18 p.m. Senators Hagerty and Scott (SC) asked a question: Given that more than 200 people have been charged for their conduct at the Capitol on January 6, that our justice system is working to hold the appropriate persons accountable and that President Trump is no longer in office isn’t this simply a political show trial that is designed to discredit President Trump and his policies and shame the 74 million Americans who voted for him?

4:13 p.m. House Manager Plaskett responded.

4:11 p.m. Senator Cortez Masto asked a question: On January 6, the anti-Semitic Proud Boys group that President Trump had told to stand by laid siege to the capitol alongside other rioters. Is there evidence that President Trump knew or should have known that his tolerance of anti-semitic speech, hate speech, combined with his own rhetoric, could incite the kind of violence we saw on January 6?

4:09 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

4:08 p.m. Senators Murkowski and Collins ask a question: Exactly when did President Trump learn of the breach of the capitol? What specific actions did he take to bring the rioting to an end? And when did he take them?

4:04 p.m. House Manager Raskin responded.

4:03 p.m. Senator Warnock submitted a question for the House Managers.

THE CLERK: IS IT TRUE OR FALSE THAT IN THE MONTHS LEADING UP TO            JANUARY 6, DOZENS OF COURTS, INCLUDING STATE AND FEDERAL COURTS            IN GEORGIA, REJECTED PRESIDENT TRUMP'S CAMPAIGN'S EFFORTS TO            OVERTURN HIS LOSS TO JOE BIDEN?            

4:03 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

4:02 p.m. Senator Graham, Cruz, Marshall and Cramer submitted a question for the former President’s Counsel.

THE CLERK: DOES A POLITICIAN RAISING BAIL FOR RIOTERS ENCOURAGE MORE RIOTING?

3:56 p.m. House Manager Castro responded.

3:56 p.m. Senators Schumer and Feinstein directed a question to the House Managers.

THE CLERK: ISN’T IT THE CASE THAT THE VIOLENT ATTACK AND SIEGE ON THE CAPITOL ON JANUARY 6 WOULD NOT HAVE HAPPENED IF NOT FOR THE CONDUCT OF PRESIDENT TRUMP?

3:54 p.m. The Senate returned from recess and will begin the question and answer part of the trial, as defined under S.Res.47, with up to 4 hours for questions and answers.

3:16 p.m. The formal defense of the 45th President of the United States has concluded. The Senate recessed subject to the call of the chair.

2:34 p.m. Mr. Castor, representing former President Trump spoke.

2:34 p.m. The Senate returned from recess.

1:53 p.m. The Senate recessed subject to the call of the Chair.

1:08 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump spoke.

12:26 p.m. Mr. Schoen, representing former President Trump spoke.

12:06 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump spoke.

12:05 p.m. Former President Trump’s counsel began their presentation.

The Senate will convene at noon and will reconvene the impeachment trial of former President Trump.

Thursday, February 11, 2021

4:42 p.m. The Senate stands adjourned until 12:00 noon on Friday, February 12, 2021.

Following the prayer and pledge, the Senate will resume the impeachment trial of former President Donald John Trump. The former President’s lawyers will make their presentation for up to 8 hours.

4:23 p.m. ML Schumer asked unanimous consent that on February 22, 2021, Senator Portman be recognized to deliver Washington’s Farewell Address.

4:22 p.m. The House Managers concluded their presentations.

4:09 p.m. House Manager Raskin began his presentation.

3:41 p.m. House Manager Neguse began his presentation.

3:12 p.m. House Manager Raskin began his presentation.

3:03 p.m. House Manager Neguse began his presentation.

2:45 p.m. The Trial resumed and House Manager Castro began his presentation.

2:10 p.m. The Senate recessed.

1:42 p.m. House Manager Cicilline began his presentation.

1:19 p.m. House Manager Degette began her presentation.

12:55 p.m. House Manager Lieu began his presentation.

12:29 p.m. House Manager Raskin began his presentation.

12:04 p.m. House Manager Degette began her presentation.

12:00 p.m. The Senate convened as a Court of Impeachment.

*****

The Senate will reconvene as a Court of Impeachment for the trial of Donald John Trump, Former President of the United States at 12:00 pm. The House managers have up to 8 hours to make their presentation.

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

7:40 p.m. ML Schumer asked unanimous consent to adjourn the Senate sitting as a Court of Impeachment until 12 Noon on Thursday, February 11th and also adjourned the Senate. Under the provisions of S.Res.47, the House Managers will continue to make their presentation for up to 8 hours on Thursday.

7:39 p.m. Senator Lee withdrew his request for a vote. Manager Raskin withdrew the remarks attributed to Senator Lee.

7:32 p.m. Senator Lee spoke on the Chair’s ruling.

7:31 p.m. Senators Wicker and Lee asked for the Chair’s ruling.

7:30 p.m. Senator Lee appealed the ruling of the Chair.

7:29 p.m. Senator Lee spoke about statements attributed to him by the House Managers relating to a phone call that were not made by him. Senator Lee asked that the statements be stricken from the record.

7:29 p.m. Manager Raskin announced that the House Managers were prepared to recess for the evening.

6:51 p.m. Manager Castro began his presentation.

6:48 p.m. Manager Cicilline began his presentation.

6:45 p.m. Manager Raskin began his presentation.

6:29 p.m. Manager Cicilline began his presentation.

6:28 p.m. The trial reconvened.

5:25 p.m. ML Schumer announced the trial will recess for the dinner break.

4:52 p.m. Manager Swalwell began his presentation.

4:11 p.m. Manager Plaskett began her presentation.

4:10 p.m. The trial reconvened.

3:43 p.m. The trial recessed.

3:21 p.m. Manger Dean began her presentation.

2:41 p.m. Manager Plaskett began her presentation.

2:25 p.m. Manager Lieu began his presentation.

2:05 p.m. Manager Dean began her presentation.

1:39 p.m. ML Schumer asked u.c. to take a 15-minute break.

1:14 p.m. Manager Swalwell began his presentation.

12:57 p.m. Manager Castro began his presentation.

12:26 p.m. Manager Neguse began his presentation.

12:03 p.m. House Manager Raskin began his presentation.

12:03 p.m. The Senate has convened as a Court of Impeachment.

12:02 p.m. ML Schumer announced the expectation of 2 ten minute breaks and a 45-minute dinner break around 6 p.m.

*****

The Senate will reconvene as a Court of Impeachment for the trial of Donald Trump, Former President of the United States at 12:00 p.m.

  • Under the provisions of S.Res.47, the House Managers will make their presentation for up to 8 hours.

Tuesday, February 9, 2021

5:10 p.m. The Senate adjourned until 12:00 noon on Wednesday.

5:09 p.m. By a tally of 56-44 the Senate decided the trial was Constitutional.

Republicans Cassidy, Collins, Murkowski, Romney, Sasse and Toomey joined all Democrats and Independents in favor.

5:01 p.m. The Senate began voting on whether the trial of a former President was Constitutional.

5:00 p.m. Mr Raskin was recognized.

3:51 p.m. Mr Schoen, representing Mr Trump was recognized.

3:02 p.m. The Senate returned from the recess, Mr Castor, representing Mr Trump was recognized.

2:41 p.m. The Senate took a brief recess.

2:32 p.m. Mr Raskin was recognized.

2:10 p.m. House Manager Mr Cicilline was recognized.

1:43 p.m. House Manager Neguse was recognized.

1:30 p.m. Manager Raskin resumed his argument.

1:14 p.m. House Manager Raskin was recognized. He made a video presentation of the attack on the Capitol.

1:13 p.m. By a vote of 89 to 11, the resolution was agreed to.

1:05 p.m. The clerk began the call of the roll.

1:04 p.m. Majority Leader Schumer called up the resolution governing the conduct of the trial and asked for the yeas and nays.

1:02 p.m. President Pro Tempore Leahy called on the sergeant at arms to make the proclamation. The sergeant at arms proclaimed the trial to be in session.

The Senate will convene as a court of impeachment at 1:00 p.m.

Following the prayer and pledge, the Senate will resume the impeachment trial of former President Donald John Trump. Then, the Senate is expected to consider a trial organizing resolution. If the Senate cannot adopt the resolution by unanimous consent, there will be a roll call vote on adoption of the resolution.

The resolution calls for up to 4 hours equally divided between the Impeachment Managers and the former president’s counsel to present arguments on the constitutionality of the trial. Following these arguments the Senate will vote, at a simple majority threshold, on whether the Senate has jurisdiction under the Constitution to try the former president. 

Additional roll call votes are expected during Tuesday’s session.

Monday, February 8, 2021

The Senate will convene at 3:00 p.m.

Following Leader remarks, the Senate will proceed to Executive Session to consider Executive Calendar #6, Denis McDonough to be Secretary of Veterans Affairs.

At 5:30 p.m., the Senate will vote on confirmation on the McDonough nomination.

Thursday, February 4, Friday February 5, 2021

5:39 a.m. The Senate adjourned.

5:36 a.m. ML Schumer wrapped up for the morning.

5:34 a.m. By a vote of 51-50 the Senate agreed to S.Con.Res.5, Sanders Budget Resolution, as amended. Vice President Harris cast the tie breaking vote.

5:24 a.m. The Senate began a vote on adoption of S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution, as amended.

5:22 a.m. Senator Sanders spoke supporting the relief package.

5:21 a.m. The Senate did not agree to the McConnell amendment #889 by a vote of 50-50.

5:14 a.m. RL McConnell spoke supporting his amendment #889.

5:13 a.m. The Senate adopted the Schumer substitute amendment #888 by a vote of 51-50 with Vice President Harris breaking the tie.

5:05 a.m. By a tally of 50-50 the Senate did not agree to the Rubio amendment #651 relating to catch and release policies and the migrant protection protocols.

4:30 a.m. By a tally of 51-49 the Senate did not agree to waive the Budget Act with respect to Sullivan Amendment #461 re: natural gas in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution.

4:21 a.m. Adopted by voice vote: Murkowski Amendment #806 (Re: oil and gas imports) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution.

4:17 a.m. By a vote of 26-74, the Senate did not agree to the Cruz amendment #871 regarding conventional biofuel credit cap.

4:03 a.m. By a vote of 53-47 the Senate adopted the Lee amend #253 (Expanding health savings accounts).

Senators Kelly, Manchin and Sinema voted yes.

3:54 a.m. By a tally of 71-29, the Senate agreed to the Romney amendment #803 to create bipartisan Congressional committees to improve the solvency of major federal trust funds.

3:38 a.m. The Senate agreed to the Portman amendment #803 to keep the
public informed of how funds for covid relief are expended by voice vote.

3:36 a.m. The Senate did not agree to the Hoeven amdt #887 50-50.

3:28 a.m. Senate did not agree to the Crapo Amendment #55 (Re: permanent lower tax rates) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution by a tally of 50-50

3:20 a.m. The Senate adopted the Lankford Amendment #837 (Re: House of Worship) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution by a tally of 51-49.

3:05 a.m. The Senate agreed to the Capito amendment #655 regarding
navigable water protections rule, 51-49 with Senator Manchin joining in favor.

2:55 a.m. The Senate did not agree (50-50) to the Scott of Florida amendment regarding immigration.

2:48 a.m. The Senate did not waive the budget act with respect to the Cruz amendment #811 regarding immigration by a tally of 40-60.

2:40 a.m. The Senate did not agree to the Lee amendment #770 by a tally of 50-50.

2:34 p.m. Senate began a vote on adoption of Lee amendment #770 (Re: Energy Royalties – Let federal revenues reflect continued leasing of oil and gas on federal lands) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution.

2:34 a.m. The Paul amendment #441 was not agreed to 8-92.

2:22 a.m. Senators Paul and Graham spoke on the Paul amendment #441 regarding foreign aid, and a roll call vote began on the amendment.

2:21 a.m. The Kennedy Amendment #782 was not agreed to by a tally of 49-51.

Senator Collins joined all Democrats and voted no.

2:08 a.m. The Senate began a vote on adoption of Kennedy Amendment #782 (Re: Preventing SBA assistance to anyone convicted in connection with a riot/civil disorder) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution.

2:06 a.m. Majority Leader Schumer listed the next set of amendments: Kennedy #782, Paul #441, Lee #770, Cruz #11, Scott (FL) #782, Capito #655, Lankford #837.

2:05 a.m. The Cassidy did not waive the budget act with respect to the Cassidy amendment on a party line tally of 50-50.

1:49 a.m. Roll call vote began on the motion to waive the budget act with respect to the Cassidy amendment #483.

1:47 a.m. Senators Cassidy and Wyden spoke on the Cassidy amendment #483 regarding stimulus checks to inmates.

1:46 a.m. By a tally of 50-50, the Senate did not waive the Budget act with respect to the Cotton amendment #66.

1:27 a.m. Roll call vote began on the motion to waive the budget act with respect to the Cotton amendment #66 (regarding SCOTUS seats).

1:25 a.m. Senators Cotton and Durbin spoke on amendment #66 regarding the Supreme Court and the number of Justices. Senator Durbin made a motion that the amendment is not germane.

1:24 a.m. The Cornyn amendment was agreed to 100-0.

1:07 a.m. Roll call vote began on the Cornyn amendment.

1:06 a.m. Senator Cornyn spoke on his amendment #558 related to police funding.

1:05 a.m. Senate did not agree to the Lee amendment #821 by a tally of 50-50. Senator Manchin voted yes and Senator Collins voted no.

12:36 a.m. Roll call vote began on the Lee amendment.

12:35 a.m. Senators Lee and Durbin spoke on the Lee amendment #821
prohibiting infringement on the free exercise of religion .

12:34 a.m. The Johnson amendment was not agreed to 50-50. Senator Collins voted against, Senator Manchin voted in favor.

12:17 a.m. Roll call vote began on the Johnson amendment.

12:15 a.m. Senators Johnson and Peters spoke about the border wall and the Johnson amendment #542.

12:14 a.m. The Senate adopted the Daines amendment #678 by a tally of 52-48.

Senators Manchin and Tester joined all Republicans and voted yes.

11:52 p.m. Roll call vote began on the Daines amendment #678 (Re: Keystone XL Pipeline) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Sanders Budget Resolution.

11:50 p.m. Senator Daines spoke on his amendment #678 regarding the Keystone pipeline.

11:48 p.m. The Ernst amendment was agreed to by voice vote.

11:46 p.m. Senators Ernst and Sanders spoke on her amendment #767 prohibiting a federal $15.00 minimum wage.

11:45 p.m. The Paul substitute amendment #1 was not agreed to 29-71.

11:24 p.m. Senator Paul spoke in favor of his amendment #1; a substitute amendment and a roll call vote began on the amendment.

11:23 p.m. The Senate adopted the Inhofe amendment #786 (re: US embassy in Jerusalem) by a vote of 97-3.

Senators voting against: Carper, Sanders and Warren.

11:04 p.m. The Senate began a vote on adoption of Inhofe Amendment #786 (Re: maintaining the US Embassy in Jerusalem) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution.

11:02 p.m. The Senate agreed to the Cortez Masto Amendment #853 (Re: support for hospitality and entertainment industries) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution by a voice vote.

11:01 p.m. Cortez Masto spoke about expanding support for hospitality industry.

11:00 p.m. By a tally of 49-51, the Senate did not waive the budget act (3/5 needed to waive) with respect to the Grassley amendment #91 prohibiting a temporary repeal of the state and local tax deduction cap. Senator Paul joined all Democrats and Independents voting against.

10:32 p.m. Roll call vote began on the motion to waive the Budget Act with respect to the Grassley amendment.

10:32 p.m. Senators Grassley and Wyden spoke on the Grassley amendment #91 prohibiting a temporary repeal of the state and local tax deduction cap.

10:32 p.m. Senator Sanders achieved UC that the next set of amendments were Grassley #91, Cortez Masto #853, Inhofe #786, Paul #1, Ernst #767, Daines #678, Johnson #542 and Lee # 821.

10:29 p.m. The Braun amendment was agreed to 57-43. Democrats voting in favor: Bennet, Casey, Heinrich, Hickenlooper, Lujan, Manchin and Tester.

10:08 p.m. The Senate began a vote on adoption of Braun Amendment #833 (Re: Prohibits Council on Environmental Quality and EPA from banning fracking) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution.

10:06 p.m. Senator Carper spoke against the Braun amendment #833.

10:05 p.m. Senator Braun spoke against banning fracking.

10:04 p.m. The Shaheen amendment was agreed to 100-0.

9:00 p.m. The Senate began a vote on the Shaheen amendment #834 as modified.

8:59 p.m. Senator Shaheen and Murkowski spoke about survivors of sexual assault and child abuse.

8:58 p.m. By a vote of 99-1 the Senate adopted the Collins amendment #546.

Senator Lee voted no.

8:33 p.m. The Senate began a vote on adoption of Collins Amendment #546 (Re: Strengthening the Provider Relief Fund; 20% set aside for rural hospitals) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Sanders Budget Resolution.

8:30 p.m. Senators Collins, Manchin and Sanders spoke on the Collins amendment #546 to strengthen the provider relief fund.

8:28 p.m. Senators Romney, Durbin, Schumer and Lee spoke about how long the votes have been taking.

8:27 p.m. The motion to waive the budget act with respect to the Ernst amendment was not agreed to 52-48. (3/5th needed to waive)

Independent King and Democrat Manchin joined all Republicans in favor.

7:58 p.m. Roll call vote began on the motion to waive the Budget Act with respect to the Ernst amendment.

7:55 p.m. Senators Ernst and Sanders spoke on the Ernst amendment #132 regarding illegal immigrants charged with a crime that results in death or serious injury.

7:54 p.m. The motion to waive the budget act with respect to the Graham amendment was not agreed to on a party line tally of 50-50.

7:27 p.m. The Senate began a vote on the motion to waive the Budget Act with respect to Graham Amendment #687 (Re: Preserving the Remain in Mexico program) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Sanders Budget Resolution.

7:25 p.m. Senators Graham and Menendez spoke on the Mexico program.

7:20 p.m. The motion to waive the budget act with respect to the Sasse amendment was not agreed to 52-48. (3/5th needed to waive) Senators Casey and Manchin joined all Republicans in favor.

6:57 p.m. Roll call vote began on the Sasse motion to waive the Durbin point of order that the Sasse amendment is not germane.

6:55 p.m. Senators Sasse and Durbin spoke on the Sasse amendment #192 regarding abortion.

6:54 p.m. The Senate adopted the Barrasso amendment #653 (Re: Supporting schools with lost revenue due to moratorium on oil and gas leasing) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution by a tally of 98-2.

Voting against: Senators Lee and Paul.

6:32 p.m. Roll call vote began on the Barrasso amendment #687 regarding
supporting schools with lost revenue due to moratorium on oil and gas leasing.

6:31 p.m. Senators Barrasso and Heinrich spoke on oil and gas drilling moratorium and on impact of loss of revenue on primary and secondary schools.

6:30 p.m. The Cardin amendment was agreed to 100-0.

6:08 p.m. Roll call vote began on the Cardin amendment
regarding vaccine administration and a public awareness campaign.

6:07 p.m. Senators Cardin and Portman spoke in favor of the Cardin amendment.

6:06 p.m. Senator Sanders achieved UC that the next set of amendments are as follows: Cardin 716, Sasse 192, Graham 687, Ernst 132, Johnson 542, Shaheen 834.

6:05 p.m. The Toomey amendment was not agreed to 50-50.

5:31 p.m. Roll call vote began on the Toomey amendment #553 regarding
ensuring state & local law enforcement are permitted to cooperate with federal officials to enforce federal law.

5:30 p.m. Senators Toomey and Durbin spoke on the Toomey amendment.

5:29 p.m. The Manchin amendment was agreed to 99-1 with Senator Paul voting against.

5:04 p.m. Roll call vote began on the Manchin amendment #775.

5:03 p.m. Senators Manchin, Collins and Senator spoke on the Manchin amendment #775 regarding limiting stimulus checks for upper income Americans.

5:02 p.m. The Senate agreed to the Young amendment #54 by a tally of 58-42. Eight Democrats voted in favor: Hassan, Hickenlooper, Kelly, Manchin, Peters, Sinema, Stabenow and Tester.

4:37 p.m. The Senate began a roll call vote on the Young amendment #54 (Re: Banning illegal immigrants to receive economic impact payments) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution.

4:35 p.m. The Senate adopted the Thune amendment #52, as modified, by voice vote. (Re: Promote mobile workforce — Limiting authority of states to tax income of employees working in other states) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution.

4:32 p.m. Not adopted, 50-50: Blunt Amendment #48 in relation to S.Con.Res. 5, Budget Resolution.

4:03 p.m. The Senate began a vote on the Blunt amendment #48 (establish a DNRF re: prohibiting the provision of COVID-19 related kindergarten-12 emergency relief to schools that do not reopen for in-person learning after the teachers of such schools are vaccinated against COVID-19).

3:56 p.m. The Senate adopted the Rubio #69 amendment by a tally of 100-0.

3:38 p.m. The Senate began a vote on adoption of Rubio amendment #69 (Re: No tax increase on small business during a pandemic) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Sanders Budget Resolution.

3:36 p.m. The Senate did not agree to the Scott (SC) #53 by a tally of 50-50.

3:13 p.m. The Senate began a vote on adoption of Scott (SC) amendment #53, establishing a deficit-neutral reserve fund (DNRF) re: ensuring the accurate reporting of COVID-19 related deaths of residents or staff at nursing homes, in relation to S.Con.Res. 5, Budget Resolution.

3:10 p.m. ML Schumer congratulated Senator Murray for casting her 9,000th vote.

3:09 p.m. The Senate adopted the Wicker amendment #261 by a tally of 90-10.

2:36 p.m. Senate began a vote on Adoption of Wicker Amendment #261 (DNRF re: to food service and drinking establishments affected by Covid-19) in relation to S.Con.Res.5, Budget Resolution.

2:34 p.m. Senator Sinema called up amendment #261 for herself and Senator Wicker.

2:15 p.m. Senator Sanders spoke on the Budget reconciliation and asked u.c. the Senate vote on the following amendments in order, Wicker/Sinema #261; Scott (SC) #53; Rubio/Scott #69; Blunt #48; Thune #52; Young #54.

2:03 p.m. Senator Graham spoke on the Budget reconciliation.

1:37 p.m. Senator Cardin spoke on the relief package.

1:30 p.m. Senator Menendez spoke on the relief package.

1:19 p.m. Senator Blumenthal spoke on the relief package.

1:12 p.m. Senator Brown spoke about the relief package.

12:57 p.m. Senator Tester spoke about the relief package.

12:38 p.m. Senator Toomey spoke about the relief package.

12:25 p.m. Senator Cornyn spoke about the relief package.

12:39 p.m. Senator Toomey spoke about the relief package.

12:17 p.m. Senator Lee spoke about amendments to the relief package.

11:54 a.m. Senator Van Hollen spoke about the relief package.

11:42 a.m. Senator Coons spoke about the relief package.

11:26 a.m. Senator Blumenthal spoke about school.

11:19 a.m. Senator Markey sapoke about the relief package.

11:16 a.m. Senator Lujan spoke about the relief package.

11:08 a.m. Senator Cantwell spoke about the relief package.

11:01 a.m. Senator Thune spoke about Biden administration actions.

10:39 a.m. Senator Durbin spoke about immigration.

10:29 a.m. Minority Leader McConnell spoke about the pandemic rescue package.

10:13 a.m. Majority Leader Schumer saluted Ann Berry upon her appointment as secretary of the Senate. He spoke about the pandemic and the relief measure within the budget reconciliation measure. He spoke about impeachment. He spoke about former President Trump and the attack on the Capitol. He spoke about student loan debt cancellation.

  • The Senate will convene at 10 a.m. and will resume consideration of S.Con.Res.5, a concurrent resolution setting forth the congressional budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2021 and setting forth the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2022 through 2030 (the vehicle for coronavirus relief legislation).
  • Senators Sanders and Graham will equally share the budget debate time from 2 p.m. until 2:30 p.m. The Senate will then dispose of any pending amendments. There is no limit to the number of amendments that can be offered before the final vote on adoption of S.Con.Res.5.
  • “”Vote-a-rama,” a long series of roll call votes on budget amendments, will begin at about 2:30 p.m. A Whip Alert will be sent when voting begins.

Wednesday, February 3, 2021

7:40 p.m. Senate stands adjourned until 10:00 a.m. Thursday, February 4. Votes on S. Con Res 5 expected to begin at 2:30 p.m.

7:01 p.m. Senator Stabenow spoke in favor of a Covid relief package.

6:30 p.m. Senator Lujan spoke in favor of a Covid relief package.

5:46 p.m. Senator Grassley spoke on Covid relief and the desire for bipartisanship.

5:39 p.m. Senators Daines, Murray, Shaheen, Blackburn spoke on planned parenthood funding, title 10 funding.

5:04 p.m. Senator Inhofe asked unanimous consent to proceed to S. 75-to prohibit discrimination by abortion against an unborn child on the basis of Down Syndrome. Senator Blumenthal objected.

4:57 p.m. The following resolutions were agreed to by voice vote:

  • S. Res. 27-organizing resolution
  • S. Res. 28-Majority committee assignments
  • S. Res. 29-Secretary of the Senate-Sonceria “Ann” Berry
  • S. Res. 30

4:50 p.m. Senator Casey spoke about pandemic relief.

4:30 p.m. Senator Cardin spoke about small business and pandemic relief.

4:08 p.m. Senator Peters spoke about pandemic relief.

3:41 p.m. Senator Brown spoke about pandemic relief.

3:34 p.m. Senator Leahy spoke about pandemic relief.

3:26 p.m. Senator Lujan spoke about the pandemic and it’s impact on Native American communities.

3:22 p.m. Senator Cortez-Masto spoke about Native American communities.

3:15 p.m. Senator Schatz spoke about the pandemic and Native American tribes.

2:58 p.m. Senator Cruz paid tribute to Jerry Elliot.

2:50 p.m. Senator Barrasso spoke about the executive orders and also about pandemic relief.

2:26 p.m. Senator Lankford spoke about the president’s executive orders.

2:19 p.m. Senator Blackburn spoke about the economy and policies toward China.

2:00 p.m. Senator Ernst spoke about energy, immigration and abortion policies.

1:42 p.m. Senator Blunt spoke about the budget and covid.

1:00 p.m. Senator Hyde-Smith spoke about energy policy and the keystone pipeline.

12:50 p.m. Senator Bennet spoke about covid relief.

12:30 p.m. Senator Kaine spoke about covid deaths.

11:53 a.m. Senator Scott (FL) spoke about covid relief and the national debt.

11:51 a.m. Senator Durbin spoke on S.Con Res. 5.

11:03 a.m. Senator Merkley spoke about pandemic relief.

10:50 a.m. Senator Cornyn spoke about pandemic related school closures.

10:12 a.m. Senator Inhofe spoke about the Iran nuclear deal.

9:58 a.m. Senator McConnell spoke about Officer Sicknick and also spoke about opening schools and pandemic relief.

9:46 a.m. Senator Schumer announced that they have deal on the organizing resolution and that it would be passed at some point today. He also spoke about climate change and committees. He also spoke about the covid relief bill.

9:00 a.m. The Senate convened and resumed consideration of S. Con. Res. 5.

The Senate will convene at 9:00 a.m.

Following Leader remarks, the Senate will resume consideration of S.Con.Res.5, with 31 hours remaining. Roll call votes are possible today.

Under the law governing the Budget’s consideration, the Senate is in 50 hours for debate, equally divided, on the concurrent resolution. Each first degree amendment is subject to 2 hours for debate equally divided and second degree amendments are subject to 1 hour for debate equally divided (within the 50 hours). Upon the use or yielding back of time, the Senate will dispose of any pending amendments. There is no limit to the number of amendments that can be offered at the end of the debate time and before a vote on adoption of the concurrent resolution. As a result, there will be a number of roll call votes at the end of that time.

Tuesday, February 2, 2021

9:21 p.m. The Senate stands adjourned until 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday.
Following Leader remarks, the Senate will resume consideration of S.Con.Res.5, with 31 hours remaining.

9:20 p.m. ML Schumer began wrap up:

  • Adopted S.Res. 25 designating the week of January 24 through January 30, 2021 as “National School Choice Week”.
  • Adopted S.Res 23 honoring the life and legacy of Henry Louis Aaron.

Passed by unanimous consent S. Res. 25, National School Choice Week.

6:49 p.m. Senator Sullivan spoke on China.

6:20 p.m. Senator Portman spoke on covid relief and on budget reconciliation.

5:59 p.m. Senator Cornyn spoke on Russia.

5:47 p.m. Senator Barrasso spoke about students returning to school.

5:35 p.m. Senator Murphy spoke on gun violence.

5:15 p.m. Senator Grassley spoke on the budget resolution.

4:53 p.m. Senator Wyden spoke supporting the budget resolution.

4:30 p.m. Senator Graham spoke on the budget resolution.

4:03 p.m. Senator Sanders spoke on the budget resolution.

3:58 p.m. By a party-line vote of 50 to 49, the Senate agreed to proceed to the budget reconciliation measure. Senator Toomey did not vote.

3:28 p.m. The Senate is voting on the motion to proceed to the reconciliation measure, S.Con.Res. 5.

3:26 p.m. By a vote of 56 to 43, the Mayorkas nomination was confirmed.

Senators voting against: 43 Republicans.

Senators voting in favor: 48 Democrats, 6 Republicans: Capito, Collins, Murkowski, Portman, Romney and Sullivan; 2 Independents: King and Sanders.

Senators not voting: 1 Republican: Toomey.

2:31 p.m. Senator Peters spoke supporting the Mayorkas nomination.

2:15 p.m. The Senate reconvened. Senator Carper spoke supporting the Mayorkas nomination.

The Senate stands in recess until 2:15 p.m.

1:15 p.m. The Senate confirmed the nomination of Peter Paul Montgomery Buttigieg, of Indiana, to be Secretary of Transportation by a tally of 86-13.

Republican Senators voting no: Blackburn, Cassidy, Cotton, Cruz, Hagerty, Hawley, Lankford, Marshall, Rubio, Scott (FL), Scott (SC) Shelby, and Tuberville.

Not voting: Senator Toomey.

11:58 a.m. The Senate began a roll call vote on confirmation of Executive Calendar #5, Peter Paul Montgomery Buttigieg, of Indiana, to be Secretary of Transportation.

11:43 a.m. Senator Cantwell spoke supporting the Buttigieg nomination.

11:35 a.m. Senator Blackburn spoke against the Mayorkas nomination.

11:32 a.m. Senator Peters spoke supporting the Buttigieg nomination.

11:24 a.m. Senator Kennedy spoke about immigration. He spoke about Baton Rouge meteorologist Pat Shingleton.

11:05 a.m. Senator Durbin spoke about nominations. He spoke about the invasion of the Capitol. He spoke in favor of Merrick Garland’s nomination to be attorney general.

10:57 a.m. Minority Leader McConnell spoke against confirmation of Alejandro Mayorkas’s nomination to be secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. He spoke about Burma.

10:44 a.m. Senator Schumer paid tribute to the late Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick. He spoke about nominations and about a COVID relief package. He said the Senate will vote this afternoon on a motion to proceed to budget reconciliation.

The Senate will convene at 10:30 a.m.

At noon the Senate will vote on confirmation of Executive Calendar #5, the nomination of Peter Buttigieg to be Secretary of Transportation.

Following that vote, the Senate will recess for caucus lunches until 2:15 p.m.

At 2:30 p.m., the Senate will vote on confirmation of the nomination of Alejandro Mayorkas to be Secretary of Homeland Security.

Monday, February 1, 2021

The Senate convened at 3:00 p.m.

We anticipate the confirmation vote previously scheduled for 5:30 p.m. today on confirmation of Executive Calendar #4, Alejandro Mayorkas to be Secretary of Homeland Security will be moved to tomorrow at 2:30 p.m.

On Tuesday, February 2nd, at 12:00 noon the Senate will vote on confirmation of Executive Calendar #5, Peter Buttigieg to be Secretary of Transportation.

3:04 p.m. Senator Leahy spoke in tribute of the national guard.

3:51 p.m. Senator Schumer spoke on the nominations of Peter Buttigieg and Alejandro Mayorkas.

4:25 p.m. Senator Tester spoke in favor of the Mayorkas nomination.

5:22 p.m. Senator Heinrich conducted wrap up. The Senate passed a resolution providing the lying in honor for slain U.S. Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick to lay in honor in the Capitol Rotunda February 2 and 3, 2021. The senate then adjourned until 10:30 a.m. February 2, 2021.

Thursday, January 28, 2021

4:33 p.m. The Senate stands adjourned until 3:00 p.m. on Monday, February 1, 2021. Following Leader remarks on Monday, the Senate will proceed to Executive Session and resume consideration of the nomination of Alejandro Nicholas Mayorkas, of the District of Columbia, to be Secretary of Homeland Security, post-cloture.

At 5:30 p.m., the Senate will vote on confirmation of the Mayorkas nomination.

On Tuesday, February 2nd, following the conclusion of morning business, the Senate will proceed to the consideration of the nomination of Peter Paul Montgomery Buttigieg, of Indiana, to be Secretary of Transportation. The time until 12:00 noon will be equally divided between the two Leaders or their designees. At 12:00 noon, the Senate will vote on confirmation of the Buttigieg nomination.

2:22 p.m. The Senate invoked cloture on the nomination of Alejandro Mayorkas to be Secretary of Homeland Security by a tally of 55-42.

  • Republicans voting in favor: Senators Capito, Collins, Murkowski, Portman, Romney and Sullivan.
  • Not voting: Senators Cramer, Graham and Warner.

1:39 p.m. The Senate began a roll call vote on the motion to invoke cloture on Executive Calendar #4 Alejandro Nicholas Mayorkas to be Secretary of Homeland Security.

1:37 p.m. Roll call vote began on cloture on the Mayorkas nomination.

1:33 p.m. Senator Peters spoke supporting the Mayorkas nomination.

1:26 p.m. Senator Rosen spoke supporting the Mayorkas nomination.

1:20 p.m. Senator Daines spoke on the 48th annual march for life.

1:00 p.m. Senator King asked u.c. that at 12:00 pm on Tuesday, February 2nd, the Senate proceed to a vote on confirmation of Executive Calendar #5 Peter Paul Montgomery Buttigieg to be Secretary of Transportation.

12:32 p.m. Senator Grassley spoke against the Mayorkas nomination.

12:20 p.m. Senator Murphy spoke on Yemen.

12:08 p.m. Senator Cornyn spoke on COVID vaccine roll out.

11:47 a.m. Senator Capito spoke against the climate executive order.

11:05 a.m. Senator Rubio spoke about abortion and the march for life.

10:49 a.m. Senator Thune spoke on infrastructure and the march for life.

10:30 a.m. Senator Durbin spoke on the attack on the Capitol and law enforcement lives lost as well as on the need for another stimulus.

10:21 a.m. RL McConnell spoke about the March for Life and on legislation by executive order.

10:04 a.m. ML Schumer spoke on the Mayorkas nomination and on COVID relief.

****

The Senate will convene at 10:00 a.m. and proceed to a period of morning business.

At 1:45 p.m., the Senate will vote on cloture on the nomination of Alejandro Nicholas Mayorkas to be Secretary of Homeland Security.

If cloture is invoked on the Mayorkas nomination, the confirmation vote will occur at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, February 1st.