Archive from February, 2021

Monday, March 1, 2021

The Senate will convene at 3:00 p.m. and resume consideration of Executive Calendar #16, Miguel Cardona to be Secretary of Education. 

At 5:30 p.m. on Monday, the Senate will proceed to two roll call votes:

1.       Confirmation of the Cardona nomination.

2.      Cloture on Executive Calendar #8, Gina Raimondo to be Secretary of Commerce.

 Cloture has also been filed on Executive Calendar #13, Cecilia Rouse to be Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers.

Thursday, February 25,2021

3:04 p.m. The Senate adjourned.

3:00 p.m. Senator Cortez Masto wrapped up for the day and week.

2:59 p.m. Cloture was invoked on the Cardona nomination, 66-32.

Senators voting in favor: 48 Democrats, 16 Republicans: Burr, Capito, Cassidy, Collins, Cornyn, Fischer, Grassley, Hyde-Smith, Johnson, McConnell, Moran, Murkowski, Portman, Romney, Rubio and Tillis; 2 Independents: King and Sanders.

Senators not voting: 2 Republicans: Inhofe and Sullivan.

1:25 p.m. Roll call vote began on cloture on the Cardona nomination.

1:14 p.m. Senator Lankford paid tribute to Maxine Horner.

1:05 p.m. Senator Durbin spoke on the Postal Service.

12:47 p.m. Senators Blunt and Klobuchar spoke on the inauguration.

12:46 p.m. The Granholm nomination was confirmed, 64-35.

Senators voting in favor: 48 Democrats, 14 Republicans: Burr, Collins, Cramer, Crapo, Daines, Hoeven, Johnson, McConnell, Murkowski, Portman, Risch, Romney, Rounds and Young; 2 Independents: King and Sanders.

Senators voting against: 35 Republicans.

Senators not voting: 1 Republican: Sullivan.

12:07 p.m. Roll call vote began on confirmation of the Granholm nomination.

12:05 p.m. Senator Manchin spoke in favor of the Granholm nomination.

12:00 p.m. Senator Barrasso spoke against the Granholm nomination.

11:56 a.m. Senator Peters spoke in support of the Granholm nomination.

11:48 a.m. Senator Thune spoke on agriculture issues.

11:20 a.m. Republican Leader McConnell spoke on election access legislation and paid tribute to outgoing Secretary of the Senate Julie Adams.

11:13 a.m. Senator Leahy paid tribute to outgoing Secretary of the Senate Julie Adams and introduced the next Secretary of the Senate, Sonceria “Ann” Berry.

11:03 a.m. Majority Leader Schumer discussed nominations and Covid-19 relief.

11:00 a.m. The Senate convened.

The Senate will convene at 11:00 a.m. and be in a period of morning business.

At approximately 12:10 p.m. – 1 roll call vote:

1. Confirmation of Executive Calendar #9, Jennifer Granholm to be Secretary of Energy.

At 1:30 p.m. – 1 roll call vote:

2. Cloture on Executive Calendar #16, Miguel Cardona to be Secretary of Education.

Wednesday, February 24, 2021

6:35 p.m. The Senate adjourned until 11 a.m. Thursday, whereupon it will resume consideration of the Granholm nomination, with a confirmation vote at noon.

There will be a cloture votes at 1:30 p.m. on the nomination of Miguel Cardona as education secretary.

6:18 p.m. Senator Portman spoke about the drug addiction epidemic.

6:11 p.m. Senator Lankford spoke about reopening schools.

6:05 p.m. The Senate consented to passage of these measures: S.Res. 70, on Senate budget and calendar matters; S.422, on employee-sharing matters; S.Res. 74, setting Rare Disease Day on Feb. 28; and S.Res. 75, celebrating Black History Month.

5:48 p.m. Senator Cornyn spoke about the crisis in Texas. He spoke about the relief bill.

5:38 p.m. Senator Daines spoke about reopening schools.

5:30 p.m. Senator Blackburn spoke about reopening schools.

5:15 p.m. Senator Collins spoke about a bill to expand broadband access in rural areas.

4:50 p.m. Senator Grassley spoke about the mass communications technology business.

4:49 p.m. By a vote of 67 to 32, the Senate invoked cloture on the nomination of Jennifer Granholm to be secretary of energy.

4:01 p.m. The Senate began voting on the motion to invoke cloture on the nomination of Jennifer Granholm to be Secretary of Energy.

4:00 p.m. The Senate reconvened.

3:08 p.m. The Senate recessed for an all Senators briefing.

2:58 p.m. Senator Barrasso spoke about energy.

2:55 p.m. Senator Schumer filed cloture on the following nominations:

  • Gina Raimondo to be Secretary of Commerce
  • Cecilia Rouse to be Chairman of the Council of Economic advisors.

1:25 p.m. Senators Boozman, Blunt, Ernst, Capito and Scott (FL) spoke about re-opening schools.

1:13 p.m. Senator Thune spoke about student loan debt.

12:54 p.m. Senator Durbin spoke about the virus and vaccines.

12:27 p.m. Majority Leader Schumer spoke about the relief package. He spoke about China policy.

12:10 p.m. Senator Kennedy spoke about re-opening schools.

The Senate will convene at 12:00 p.m. and resume consideration of the nomination of Jennifer Granholm to be Secretary of Energy.

At 3:00 p.m. the Senate will recess until 4:00 p.m. to accommodate an all Senators briefing on Capitol security.

At 4:00 p.m. there will be a cloture vote on the Granholm nomination.

Tuesday, February 23, 2021

6:53 p.m. The Senate adjourned.

6:29 p.m. Senator Casey spoke on Black history month.

5:45 p.m. Senator Barrasso spoke on Covid-19 relief.

5:30 p.m. Senator Durbin spoke on suicide and opioids.

5:13 p.m. Senator Cornyn spoke about the recent bad weather in Texas, and the Garland and Tanden nominations.

5:04 p.m. Senator Grassley spoke on school shootings.

4:52 p.m. Senator Blackburn spoke against the Becerra nomination.

4:37 p.m. Senator Sullivan spoke against the Vilsack nomination and on energy.

3:54 p.m. Majority Leader Schumer filed cloture on the nomination of Miguel Cardona to be Secretary of Education.

3:53 p.m. The Thomas-Greenfield nomination was confirmed 78-21.

3:07 p.m. The Senate began a roll call vote on confirmation of Executive Calendar #11 Linda Thomas-Greenfield to be Representative of the U.S. to the Sessions of the General Assembly of the UN during her tenure of service as Representative of the U.S. to the UN.

3:06 p.m. The Senate confirmed the nomination of Tom Vilsack to be Secretary of Agriculture by a vote of 92-7.

Voting against: Senators Cruz, Hawley, Paul, Rubio, Sanders, Scott (FL) and Sullivan.

Not voting: Senator Shaheen.

2:27 p.m. The Senate began a vote on confirmation of the Vilsack nomination.

2:23 p.m. Senator Boozman spoke on the Vilsack nomination.

2:23 p.m. Senator Boozman spoke on the Vilsack nomination.

2:15 p.m. Senator Stabenow spoke supporting the Vilsack nomination.

12:41 p.m. The Senate recessed until 2:15 p.m.

12:40 p.m. Cloture was invoked on the Thomas Greenfield nomination by a tally of 77-20.

12:08 p.m. Roll call vote began on cloture on the nomination of Linda Thomas Greenfield to be representative to the General Assembly.

12:07 p.m. The nomination was confirmed 78-20.

11:30 a.m. Roll call vote began on confirmation of the Thomas Greenfield nomination to be Ambassador to the United Nations.

11:09 a.m. Senator Thune spoke on Covid-19 relief.

10:53 a.m. RL McConnell spoke on returning to schools and on the Becerra nomination.

10:39 a.m. ML Schumer spoke on nominations, Covid-19 relief and on the January 6th attack.

10:30 a.m. The Senate convened.

*****

The Senate will convene at 10:30 a.m. and resume consideration of Executive Calendar #10, Linda Thomas-Greenfield to be Ambassador to the United Nations.

At 11:30 a.m. two roll call votes:

  1. Confirmation of Linda Thomas-Greenfield to be Ambassador to the United Nations.
  2. Cloture on Executive Calendar #11, Linda Thomas-Greenfield to be Representative to the Sessions of the General Assembly of the United Nations during her tenure of service as Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations.

Following the cloture vote, the Senate will recess until 2:15pm to allow for the weekly caucus meetings.

At approximately 2:35pm – 2 roll call votes:

1. Confirmation of Executive Calendar #7, Thomas Vilsack to be Secretary of Agriculture.

2. If cloture is invoked, confirmation of the Thomas-Greenfield nomination to be Representative to the Sessions of the General Assembly of the United Nations.

During Monday’s session of the Senate, Senator Schumer filed cloture on  Executive Calendar #9, Jennifer Mulhern Granholm, to be Secretary of the Energy. Under the rule and if no agreement is reached, that cloture vote would occur 1 hour after the Senate convenes on Wednesday.

Monday, February 22, 2021

6:17 p.m. The Senate adjourned.

6:16 p.m. Majority Leader Schumer wrapped up for the evening.

6:15 p.m. Cloture was invoked on the Thomas-Greenfield nomination, 75-20.

5:30 p.m. Roll call vote began on cloture on the Thomas-Greenfield nomination.

5:24 p.m. Senator Menendez spoke in favor of the Thomas-Greenfield nomination.

5:15 p.m. Senator Cotton spoke against the Thomas-Greenfield nomination.

4:35 p.m. Senator Grassley spoke on the Vilsack nomination.

4:28 p.m. Senator Durbin paid tribute to John Lewis on what would have been his 81st birthday.

4:00 p.m. Republican Leader McConnell spoke on winter storms in Kentucky and Covid relief.

3:48 p.m. Majority Leader Schumer spoke on cabinet nominations, Covid relief and the recent impeachment trial. He then filed cloture on the nomination of Jennifer Granholm to be Secretary of Energy.

3:02 p.m. Senator Portman read President Washington’s farewell address.

3:00 p.m. The Senate convened.

The Senate will convene at 3:00 p.m. Following the prayer and pledge, Senator Portman will be recognized to deliver Washington’s Farewell Address.

Following the address, the Senate will proceed to consider the nomination of Linda Thomas-Greenfield to be the Ambassador to the United Nations.

At 5:30 p.m. The Senate will vote on cloture on the Thomas-Greenfield nomination.

At a time to be determined on Tuesday, February 23, the Senate will consider Executive Calendar #7, Thomas Vilsack to be Secretary of Agriculture. After up to 20 minutes for debate, the Senate will vote on confirmation of the nomination.

Friday, February 19, 2021

10:19 a.m. The Senate met for a pro forma session, Senator Van Hollen presided and no business was conducted.

Tuesday, February 16, 2021

The Senate met in a pro forma session at 10:00 a.m. with Senator Padilla presiding. No business was conducted.

Saturday, February 13, 2021

5:29 p.m. The Senate adjourned until 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 16, when there will be a pro forma session. There will be another pro forma session at 10:15 a.m. Friday, Feb. 19.

5:23 p.m. During wrap-up, the Senate consented to passage of S. Res. 61, paying tribute to the late George Schultz, and S. Res. 62, congratulating the Super Bowl champion Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

The Senate agreed to consider the nomination of Thomas Vilsack to be Agriculture Secretary at a time to be determined on Tuesday, Feb. 23.

Majority Leader Schumer filed cloture on the nominations of Linda Thomas-Greenfield to be U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. and representative the Security Council.

The Senate agreed that it will next convene for legislative business on Monday, Feb. 22, when Senator Portman will deliver George Washington’s Farewell Address. At 5:30 p.m., there will be a cloture vote on the Thomas-Greenfield nominations.

4:43 p.m. Senator Collins spoke about the case.

4:28 p.m. Senator Cardin spoke about the case.

4:07 p.m. Senator McConnell spoke about the case.

3:54 p.m. Senator Schumer spoke about the case.

3:48 p.m. By a vote of 57 to 43, the Senate acquitted former President Trump.
Republicans voting guilty: Burr, Cassidy, Collins, Murkowski, Romney, Sasse, Toomey. All Democrats and independents King and Sanders voted guilty.

3:39 p.m. The vote on impeachment began, two-thirds majority required.

2:45 p.m. Counsel van der Veen began the argument for the defense.

2:35 p.m. Manager Raskin continued the arguments for the House.

2:18 p.m. Manager Neguse continued the arguments for the House.

1:52 p.m. Manager Dean resumed the House arguments.

1:51 p.m. Senator Lee withdrew his appeal. Senator Leahy reminded the parties that new evidence may not be introduced during closing arguments.

1:38 p.m. Senator Lee sought to raise a point of order. A quorum call began.

1:16 p.m. Manager Cicilline continued closing arguments for the House.

12:53 p.m. Manager Raskin began closing arguments. Up to four hours of debate are permitted, equally divided between the two sides.

12:51 p.m. By consent, the Senate admitted into the trial record a statement by Representative Jaime Herrera Beutler.

12:33 p.m. The Senate reconvened.

11:43 a.m. The Senate recessed until 12:30 p.m.

10:34 a.m. The motion on whether it shall be in order to consider and debate under the impeachment rules any motion to subpoena witnesses was agreed to 55-45, with Republicans Collins, Graham, Murkowski, Romney and Sasse joining all Democrats and Independents in favor.

10:20 a.m. The Senate began a roll call vote on whether or not it shall be in order to consider and debate under the impeachment rules any motion to subpoena witnesses and or documents.

10:19 a.m. House Manager Raskin spoke briefly.

10:14 a.m. Mr Van Der Veen responded.

10:11 a.m. House Manager Raskin spoke on witnesses.

10:08 a.m. Mr Van Der Veen responded.

10:04 a.m. The Senate began up to two hours debating whether to call witnesses, with House Manager Raskin speaking first.

10:00 a.m. The Senate convened.

The Senate will reconvene at 10 a.m. as the Court of Impeachment for the trial of former President Trump. There will be up to two hours of debate on whether to call witnesses, followed by a vote on the question.

Friday, February 12, 2021

6:29 p.m. The Senate stands adjourned until 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, February 13, 2021.

6:23 p.m. ML Schumer announced there were no further questions. ML Schumer and RL McConnell spoke about USCP officer Eugene Goodman and asked unanimous consent to call up and pass S. 35 Awarding Capitol Police officer Eugene Goodman the Congressional Gold Medal. The bill was passed by unanimous consent.

6:20 p.m. Mr. Castor, representing former President Trump responded. House Manager Raskin responded.

6:18 p.m. Senator Cornyn asked both sides: The House managers have argued that if the Senate cannot convict former officers, then the Constitution creates a January exception. Pursuant to which a President is free to act with impunity because he is not subject to impeachment, conviction, and removal, and/or disqualification. But isn’t a President subject to criminal prosecution after he leaves office for acts committed in office, even if those acts are committed in January?

6:12 p.m. House Manager Castro responded.

6:11 p.m. Senator Bennett asked: SINCE THE NOVEMBER ELECTION, THE GEORGIA SECRETARY OF STATE, THE VICE PRESIDENT, AND OTHER PUBLIC OFFICIALS, WITHSTOOD ENORMOUS PRESSURE TO UPHOLD THE LAWFUL ELECTION OF PRESIDENT BIDEN AND THE RULE OF LAW. WHAT WOULD HAVE HAPPENED IF THESE OFFICIALS HAD BOWED TO THE FORCE PRESIDENT TRUMP EXERTED OR THE MOB THAT ATTACKED THE CAPITOL?

6:10 p.m. Senator Leahy noted for all Counsel that all parties in the Chamber must refrain from using language that is not conducive to civil discourse.

6:06 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

6:04 p.m. Senator Rubio asked both sides: Voting to convict the former President would create a new precedent that a former official can be convicted and disqualified by the Senate. Therefore, is it not true that under this new precedent, a future house, facing partisan pressure to lock her up, could impeach a former Secretary of State and a future Senate be forced to put her on trial and potentially disqualify from any future office?

6:01 p.m. House Manager Raskin responded.

6:01 p.m. Senator Van Hollen asked the House Mangers: WOULD YOU PLEASE RESPOND TO THE ANSWER THAT WAS JUST GIVEN BY THE FORMER PRESIDENT’S COUNSEL.

5:56 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

5:55 p.m. Senator Marshall asked: THE HOUSE MANAGERS SINGLE ARTICLE OF IMPEACHMENT IS CENTERED ON THE ACCUSATION THAT PRESIDENT TRUMP SINGULARLY INCITED A CROWD INTO A RIOT. DIDN’T THE HOUSE MANAGERS CONTRADICT THEIR OWN CHARGE BY OUTLINING THE PREMEDITATED NATURE AND PLANNING OF THIS EVENT AND BY ALSO SHOWING THE CROWD WAS GATHERED AT THE CAPITOL EVEN BEFORE THE SPEECH STARTED AND BARRIERS WERE PUSHED OVER SOME 20 MINUTES BEFORE THE CONCLUSION OF TRUMP’s SPEECH?

5:51 p.m. House Manager Raskin responded.

5:50 p.m. Senator Blumenthal asked: FORMER PRESIDENT TRUMP AND HIS ATTORNEYS HAVE CITED THE BRANDENBERG V. OHIO CASE SAYING THAT THE FIRST AMENDMENT PROTECTS TRUMP. DID IT HOLD PUBLIC OFFICIALS ACCOUNTABLE THROUGH THE IMPEACHMENT PROCESS FOR THE INCITEMENT OF VIOLENCE?

5:43 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

5:43 p.m. Senator Sullivan asked: THE HOUSE MANAGER SAID YESTERDAY THAT DUE PROCESS IS DISCRETIONARY, MEANING THE HOUSE IS NOT REQUIRED TO PROVIDE AND INDEED DID NOT PROVIDE IN THIS SNAP IMPEACHMENT ANY CONSTITUTIONAL PROTECTIONS TO A DEFENDANT IN THE HOUSE IMPEACHMENT PROCEEDINGS. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR OUR CONSTITUTIONAL ORDER OF THIS NEW HOUSE PRECEDENT COMBINED WITH THE SENATE’S POWER TO DISQUALIFY FROM PUBLIC OFFICE A PRIVATE CITIZEN IN AN IMPEACHMENT TRIAL?

5:40 p.m. House Manager Plaskett responded.

5:39 p.m. Senator Manchin asked: WOULD THE PRESIDENT BE MADE AWARE OF THE F.B.I. AND INTELLIGENCE INFORMATION OF A POSSIBLE ATTACK, AND WOULD THE PRESIDENT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR NOT PREPARING TO PROTECT THE CAPITOL AND ALL ELECTED OFFICIALS OF GOVERNMENT WITH NATIONAL GUARD AND LAW ENFORCEMENT AS HE DID WHEN HE APPEARED IN FRONT OF THE ST. JOHN’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH?

5:36 p.m. House Manager Raskin responded.

5:35 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

5:34 p.m. Senator Cassidy asked: SENATOR TUBERVILLE REPORTS THAT HE SPOKE TO PRESIDENT TRUMP AT 2:15 P.M. HE TOLD THE PRESIDENT THAT THE VICE PRESIDENT HAD JUST EVACUATED. I PRESUMED IT WAS UNDERSTOOD AT THIS TIME THAT RIOTERS HAD ENTERED THE CAPITOL AND THREATENED THE SAFETY OF SENATORS AND THE VICE PRESIDENT. EVEN AFTER HEARING — EVEN AFTER HEARING OF THIS, AT 2:24 P.M. THAT MIKE PENCE LACKED COURAGE. HE DID NOT CALL FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT BACKUP UNTIL THEN. THE TWEET AND LACK OF RESPONSE SUGGESTS PRESIDENT TRUMP DID NOT CARE THAT VICE PRESIDENT PENCE WAS ENDANGERED OR THAT LAW ENFORCEMENT WAS OVERWHELMED. DOES THIS SHOW THAT PRESIDENT TRUMP WAS TOLERANT OF THE INTIMIDATION OF VICE PRESIDENT PENCE?

5:29 p.m. House Manager Castro responded.

5:28 p.m. Senator Murray asked the House Managers AT 6:01 P.M. EASTERN TIME ON JANUARY 6, PRESIDENT TRUMP TWEETED, THESE ARE THE THINGS THAT HAPPEN WHEN A SACRED LANDSLIDE ELECTION VICTORY IS SO UNCEREMONIOUSLY AND VICIOUSLY STRIPPED AWAY FROM GREAT PATRIOTS WHO HAVE BEEN BADLY AND UNFAIRLY TREATED FOR SO LONG. ADDING, FOR RIOTERS TO GO HOME WITH LOVE AND IN PEACE. WHAT IS THE RELEVANCE OF THIS TWEET TO PRESIDENT’S TRUMP GUILT?

5:21 p.m. House Manager Raskin and and Mr Van Der Veen responded.

5:20 p.m. Senator Cruz asked both sides OUT OF THE THEIR 16 HOURS, THE HOUSE MANAGERS DEVOTED ALL OF 15 MINUTES TO ARTICULATING A NEWLY CREATED LEGAL STANDARD FOR INCITEMENT. ONE WAS VIOLENCE FORESEEABLE? TWO, DID HE ENCOURAGE VIOLENCE? THREE, DID HE DO SO WILLFULLY? IS THIS NEW STANDARD DERIVED FROM THE CRIMINAL CODE OR ANY SUPREME COURT CASE?

5:16 p.m. House Managers Castro and Raskin responded.

5:15 p.m. Senator Merkley asked House Managers IF A PRESIDENT SPINS A BIG LIE TO ANGER AMERICANS AND STOKES THE FURRY BY REPEATING THE LIE AT EVENT AFTER EVENT AND INVITES VIOLENT GROUPS TO D.C. ON THE DAY AND HOUR NECESSARY TO INTERRUPT THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE COUNT AND DOES NOTHING TO STOP THOSE GROUPS FROM ADVANCING ON THE CAPITOL AND FAILS TO SUMMON THE NATIONAL GUARD TO PROTECT THE CAPITOL AND THEN EXPRESSES PLEASURE AND DELIGHT THAT THE CAPITOL WAS UNDER ATTACK, IS THE PRESIDENT INNOCENT OF INCITING AN INSURRECTION BECAUSE IN A SPEECH HE SAYS “BE PEACEFUL”.

5:12 p.m. Mr Van Der Veen and House Manager Plaskett responded.

5:10 p.m. Senator Johnson asked both sides THE HOUSE MANAGERS ASSERT THAT THE JANUARY 6 ATTACK WAS PREDICTABLE AND IT WAS FORESEEABLE. IF SO, WHY DID IT APPEAR THAT LAW ENFORCEMENT AT THE CAPITOL WERE CAUGHT OFFGUARD AND UNABLE TO PREVENT THE BREACH? WHY DID THE HOUSE SERGEANT AT ARMS REPORTEDLY TURN DOWN A REQUEST TO ACTIVATE THE NATIONAL GUARD STATING THAT HE WAS NOT COMFORTABLE WITH THE OPTICS?

5:03 p.m. House Manager Plaskett and Mr Van Der Veen responded.

5:00 p.m. Senator Sanders asked both sides THE HOUSE PROSECUTORS HAVE STATED OVER AND OVER AGAIN THAT PRESIDENT TRUMP WAS PERPETRATING A BIG LIE WHEN HE REPEATEDLY CLAIMED THAT THE ELECTION WAS STOLEN FROM HIM AND THAT HE ACTUALLY WON THE ELECTION BY A LANDSLIDE. ARE THE PROSECUTORS RIGHT WHEN THEY CLAIM THAT TRUMP WAS TELLING A BIG LIE OR IN YOUR JUDGMENT, DID TRUMP ACTUALLY WIN THE ELECTION?

4:59 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

4:58 p.m. Senator Cramer asked a question: GIVEN THE ALLEGATIONS OF THE HOUSE MANAGER THAT PRESIDENT TRUMP HAS TOLERATED ANTI-SEMITIC RHETORIC, HAS THERE BEEN A MORE PRO-ISRAEL PRESIDENT THAN PRESIDENT TRUMP?

4:55 p.m. House Manager Raskin responded.

4:54 p.m. Senator Warren asked a question: THE DEFENSE’S PRESENTATION HIGHLIGHTED THE FACT THAT DEMOCRATIC MEMBERS OF CONGRESS RAISED OBJECTIONS TO COUNTING OF ELECTORAL VOTES IN PAST JOINT SESSIONS OF CONGRESS. TO YOUR KNOWLEDGE, WERE ANY OF THOSE DEMOCRATIC OBJECTIONS RAISED AFTER INSURRECTIONISTS STORMED THE CAPITOL IN ORDER TO PREVENT THE COUNTING OF ELECTORAL VOTES, AND AFTER THE PRESIDENT’S PERSONAL LAWYER ASKED SENATORS TO MAKE THESE OBJECTIONS SPECIFICALLY TO DELAY THE CERTIFICATION?

4:52 p.m. House Manager Raskin responded.

4:49 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

4:47 p.m. Senators Hawley and Cramer asked a question: IF THE SENATE’S POWER TO DISQUALIFY IS NOT DERIVATIVE OF THE POWER TO REMOVE A CONVICTED PRESIDENT FROM OFFICE, COULD THE SENATE DISQUALIFY A SITTING PRESIDENT BUT NOT REMOVE HIM OR HER?

4:42 p.m. House Manager Lieu responded.

4:41 p.m. Senator Padilla asked a question HAVING BEEN ON THE FLONT LINES OF — FRONT LINES OF COMBATING THE BIG LIE OVER THE PAST FOUR YEARS AS CALIFORNIA’S CHIEF ELECTION OFFICER, IT IS CLEAR THAT PRESIDENT TRUMP’S PLOT TO UNDERMINE THE 2020 ELECTION WAS BUILT ON LIES AND CONSPIRACY THEORIES. HOW DID THIS PLOT TO UNCONSTITUTIONALLY KEEP PRESIDENT TRUMP IN POWER LEAD TO THE RADICALIZATION OF SO MANY OF PRESIDENT TRUMP’S FOLLOWERS AND THE RESULTING ATTACK ON THE CAPITOL?

4:39 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

4:38 p.m. Senator Lee submitted a question on behalf of Senators Blackburn and Portman. Multiple state Constitutions enacted prior to 1787, namely the constitutions of Delaware, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Vermont specifically provided for the impeachment of a former officer. Given the framers of the US Constitution would’ve been aware of these provisions does their decision to omit language specifically authorizing the impeachment of former officials indicate that they did not intend for our Constitution to allow for the impeachment of former officials?

4:33 p.m. House Manager Plaskett responded.

4:31 p.m. Senators Klobuchar, Casey and Brown asked a question: In presenting your case, you relied on past precedence from impeachment trials such as William Belknap’s impeachment. After what you have presented in the course of this trial if we do not convict former president trump, what message will we be sending to future presidents and Congresses?

4:30 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

4:27 p.m. House Manager Castro responded.

4:26 p.m. Senators Romney and Collins asked a question: When President Trump sent the disparaging tweet at 2:24 p.m. regarding Vice President Pence, was he aware that the Vice President had been removed from the Senate by the Secret Service for his safety?

4:23 p.m. House Manager Plaskett responded.

4:21 p.m. Senators Markey and Duckworth asked a question: Exactly when did the President learn of the breach at the Capitol and what steps did he take to address the violence?

4:19 p.m. Mr. Castor, representing former President Trump responded.

4:18 p.m. Senators Hagerty and Scott (SC) asked a question: Given that more than 200 people have been charged for their conduct at the Capitol on January 6, that our justice system is working to hold the appropriate persons accountable and that President Trump is no longer in office isn’t this simply a political show trial that is designed to discredit President Trump and his policies and shame the 74 million Americans who voted for him?

4:13 p.m. House Manager Plaskett responded.

4:11 p.m. Senator Cortez Masto asked a question: On January 6, the anti-Semitic Proud Boys group that President Trump had told to stand by laid siege to the capitol alongside other rioters. Is there evidence that President Trump knew or should have known that his tolerance of anti-semitic speech, hate speech, combined with his own rhetoric, could incite the kind of violence we saw on January 6?

4:09 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

4:08 p.m. Senators Murkowski and Collins ask a question: Exactly when did President Trump learn of the breach of the capitol? What specific actions did he take to bring the rioting to an end? And when did he take them?

4:04 p.m. House Manager Raskin responded.

4:03 p.m. Senator Warnock submitted a question for the House Managers.

THE CLERK: IS IT TRUE OR FALSE THAT IN THE MONTHS LEADING UP TO            JANUARY 6, DOZENS OF COURTS, INCLUDING STATE AND FEDERAL COURTS            IN GEORGIA, REJECTED PRESIDENT TRUMP'S CAMPAIGN'S EFFORTS TO            OVERTURN HIS LOSS TO JOE BIDEN?            

4:03 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump responded.

4:02 p.m. Senator Graham, Cruz, Marshall and Cramer submitted a question for the former President’s Counsel.

THE CLERK: DOES A POLITICIAN RAISING BAIL FOR RIOTERS ENCOURAGE MORE RIOTING?

3:56 p.m. House Manager Castro responded.

3:56 p.m. Senators Schumer and Feinstein directed a question to the House Managers.

THE CLERK: ISN’T IT THE CASE THAT THE VIOLENT ATTACK AND SIEGE ON THE CAPITOL ON JANUARY 6 WOULD NOT HAVE HAPPENED IF NOT FOR THE CONDUCT OF PRESIDENT TRUMP?

3:54 p.m. The Senate returned from recess and will begin the question and answer part of the trial, as defined under S.Res.47, with up to 4 hours for questions and answers.

3:16 p.m. The formal defense of the 45th President of the United States has concluded. The Senate recessed subject to the call of the chair.

2:34 p.m. Mr. Castor, representing former President Trump spoke.

2:34 p.m. The Senate returned from recess.

1:53 p.m. The Senate recessed subject to the call of the Chair.

1:08 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump spoke.

12:26 p.m. Mr. Schoen, representing former President Trump spoke.

12:06 p.m. Mr. Van Der Veen, representing former President Trump spoke.

12:05 p.m. Former President Trump’s counsel began their presentation.

The Senate will convene at noon and will reconvene the impeachment trial of former President Trump.

Thursday, February 11, 2021

4:42 p.m. The Senate stands adjourned until 12:00 noon on Friday, February 12, 2021.

Following the prayer and pledge, the Senate will resume the impeachment trial of former President Donald John Trump. The former President’s lawyers will make their presentation for up to 8 hours.

4:23 p.m. ML Schumer asked unanimous consent that on February 22, 2021, Senator Portman be recognized to deliver Washington’s Farewell Address.

4:22 p.m. The House Managers concluded their presentations.

4:09 p.m. House Manager Raskin began his presentation.

3:41 p.m. House Manager Neguse began his presentation.

3:12 p.m. House Manager Raskin began his presentation.

3:03 p.m. House Manager Neguse began his presentation.

2:45 p.m. The Trial resumed and House Manager Castro began his presentation.

2:10 p.m. The Senate recessed.

1:42 p.m. House Manager Cicilline began his presentation.

1:19 p.m. House Manager Degette began her presentation.

12:55 p.m. House Manager Lieu began his presentation.

12:29 p.m. House Manager Raskin began his presentation.

12:04 p.m. House Manager Degette began her presentation.

12:00 p.m. The Senate convened as a Court of Impeachment.

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The Senate will reconvene as a Court of Impeachment for the trial of Donald John Trump, Former President of the United States at 12:00 pm. The House managers have up to 8 hours to make their presentation.

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